Sam Neill Net Worth 2021, Age, Wife, Girlfriend, Height, Family, Parents, TV Shows

Sam Neill net worth

Read the complete write-up of Sam Neill net worth, age, wife, girlfriend, children, family, parents, tv shows as well as other information you need to know.

Introduction

Sam Neill is a New Zealand actor, director, producer, and writer. He first achieved recognition with his appearance in the 1977 film Sleeping Dogs, which he followed with leading roles in My Brilliant Career (1979), Omen III: The Final Conflict, Possession (both 1981), A Cry in the Dark (1988), Dead Calm (1989), The Hunt For Red October (1990), and The Piano (1993).

Neill came to international prominence as Dr Alan Grant in Jurassic Park (1993), a role that he reprises in Jurassic Park III (2001) and the upcoming Jurassic World: Dominion (2022). He has appeared in numerous television series, including Reilly, Ace of Spies (1983), The Simpsons (1994), Merlin (1998), The Tudors (2007), Crusoe (2008–2010), Happy Town (2010), Alcatraz (2012), Peaky Blinders (2013–2014), and Rick and Morty (2019). He has presented and narrated several documentaries. In 2021, he had a main role in the Apple TV+ sci-fi series Invasion.

He is the recipient of the AACTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role, the Longford Lyell Award, the New Zealand Film Award and the Logie Award for Most Outstanding Actor. He also has three Golden Globe and two Primetime Emmy Award nominations. He lives in Alexandra, New Zealand and has three children and one stepchild.

Early life

NameSam Neill
Net Worth$15 million
ProfessionActor, Director, Producer, Writer
Height1.83m
Age74 years
Sam Neill net worth 2021

Nigel John Dermot “Sam” Neill DCNZM OBE was born on September 14, 1947 (age 74 years) in Omagh, Northern Ireland. He is the son of Priscilla Beatrice Ingham and Dermot Neill. His father Dermot, an army officer, was a third-generation New Zealander, while his mother was born in England. His great-grandfather Percy Neill left Belfast, in Ireland, for New Zealand in 1860, settling in Dunedin. He was the son of a wine merchant importing wine from France.

At the time of Neill’s birth, his father was stationed in Northern Ireland, serving with the Royal Irish Fusiliers. His father’s family-owned Neill and Co. (later part of the listed hospitality group Wilson Neill). Neill holds British and Irish citizenship through his place of birth but identifies primarily as a New Zealander.

Neill moved with his family to New Zealand in 1954, where he attended the Anglican boys’ boarding school Christ’s College, Christchurch. He went on to study English literature at the University of Canterbury, where he had his first exposure to acting. He moved to Wellington to continue his tertiary education at Victoria University, where he graduated with a BA in English literature.

In 2004, on the Australian talk show Enough Rope, interviewer Andrew Denton briefly touched on the topic of Neill’s stuttering. It affected him a lot and as a result, he was “hoping that people wouldn’t talk to him” so he would not have to answer. He also stated, “I kind of outgrew it. I can still … you can still detect me as a stammerer.”

He first took to calling himself “Sam” at school because there were several other students named Nigel, and because he felt the name Nigel was “a little effete for … a New Zealand playground”.

Career

Sam Neil’s first film was a New Zealand television movie The City of No (1971). He followed it with a short, The Water Cycle (1972) and the TV movie Hunt’s Duffer (1973). Neill wrote and directed a film for the New Zealand National Film Unit, Telephone Etiquette (1974). He also appeared in Landfall (1976).

Neill’s breakthrough performance in New Zealand was the film Sleeping Dogs (1977), the first local film to be widely screened abroad. He went to Australia where he had a guest role on the TV show The Sullivans. He was the romantic male lead in My Brilliant Career (1979), opposite Judy Davis, which was a big international success.

He made some Australian films that were less widely seen: The Journalist (1979), Just Out of Reach (1979) and Attack Force Z (1981), and appeared in television productions such as Young Ramsay and Lucinda Brayford.

International career

Sam Neill won his first big international role in 1981, as Damien Thorn, son of the devil, in Omen III: The Final Conflict; also in that year, he played an outstanding main role in Andrzej Żuławski’s cult film Possession.

He was one of the leading candidates to succeed Roger Moore in the role of James Bond but lost out to Timothy Dalton. Among his many Australian roles is playing Michael Chamberlain in Evil Angels (1988) (released as A Cry in the Dark outside of Australia and New Zealand), a film about the case of Azaria Chamberlain.

Notable movies

Neill has played heroes and occasionally villains in a succession of film and television dramas and comedies. In the UK, he won early fame and was Golden Globe-nominated after portraying real-life spy, Sidney Reilly, in the mini-series Reilly, Ace of Spies (1983). An early American starring role was in 1987’s Amerika, playing a senior KGB officer leading the occupation and division of a defeated United States.

His leading and co-starring roles in films include the thriller Dead Calm (1989), the two-part historical epic La Révolution française (1989) (as Marquis de Lafayette), The Hunt for Red October (1990), Death in Brunswick (1990), Jurassic Park (1993), Sirens (1994), The Jungle Book (1994), John Carpenter’s In the Mouth of Madness (1995), Event Horizon (1997), Bicentennial Man (1999), and the comedy The Dish (2000).

Neill has occasionally acted in New Zealand films, including The Piano (1993), Perfect Strangers (2003), Under the Mountain (2009), and Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016). He returned to directing in 1995 with the documentary Cinema of Unease: A Personal Journey by Sam Neill (1995) which he wrote and directed with Judy Rymer.

In 1993, he co-starred with Anne Archer in Question of Faith, an independent drama based on a true story about one woman’s fight to beat cancer and have a baby. In 2000, he provided the voice of Sam Sawn-off in The Magic Pudding. In 2001, he hosted and narrated a documentary series for the BBC entitled Space (Hyperspace in the United States). He portrayed the eponymous wizard in Merlin (1998), a miniseries based on the legends of King Arthur. He reprised his role in the sequel, Merlin’s Apprentice (2006).

Neill starred in the historical drama The Tudors, playing Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. “I have to say I really enjoyed making The Tudors”, he said, “It was six months with a character that I found immensely intriguing, with a cast that I liked very much and with a story I found very compelling. It has elements that are hard to beat: revenge and betrayal, lust and treason, all the things that make for good stories.”

He acted in the short-lived Fox TV series Alcatraz (2012) as Emerson Hauser. He played the role of Otto Luger in the fantasy adventure movie The Adventurer: The Curse of the Midas Box (2014). He had a role in the BBC series Peaky Blinders, set in post-World War I Birmingham. He played the role of Chief Inspector Chester Campbell, a sadistic corrupt policeman, who came to clean up the town on Churchill’s orders. In the 2015 BBC TV miniseries And Then There Were None, based on Agatha Christie’s thriller, he played the role of General MacArthur.

In 2016, he starred in the New Zealand-made film, Hunt for the Wilderpeople, directed by Taika Waititi, as well as the ITV miniseries Tutankhamun. In 2017, Neill appeared in a scene in Waititi’s fantasy sequel Thor: Ragnarok, in which he portrays an actor playing Odin (as depicted by Anthony Hopkins), alongside Luke Hemsworth and Matt Damon as actors playing Thor and Loki, respectively.

In 2018, he portrayed Mr McGregor and also provided the voice of Tommy Brock, in Peter Rabbit. In 2019, he was cast for the role of Denis Goldberg in Escape from Pretoria; however, the role was subsequently recast with Ian Hart. In late 2019, he was announced to renew his character of Dr Alan Grant in Jurassic World: Dominion, set for release in 2022.

Wife

Sam Neill is dating Australian political journalist Laura Tingle. However, from about 1980 to 1989, Neill was in a relationship with actress Lisa Harrow. They have a son, Tim Neil, born in 1983. Neill subsequently married his second wife make-up artist Noriko Watanabe in 1989 and they have one daughter, Elena (born in 1991). Neill separated from ex-wife Watanabe in 2017.

He is stepfather to Maiko Spencer, a daughter from Watanabe’s first marriage. In his early 20s, he fathered a son, Andrew, who was adopted by someone else. In 2014, Neill said the two “went looking for one another” and that their reunion was “much more grown-up” than expected.

Other businesses

Sam Neill lives in Alexandra and owns a winery called Two Paddocks, consisting of a vineyard at Gibbston and two near Alexandra, all in the Central Otago wine region of New Zealand’s South Island. His avocation is running Two Paddocks. “I’d like the vineyard to support me but I’m afraid it is the other way round. It is not a very economic business”, said Neill, “It is a ridiculously time- and money-consuming business. I would not do it if it was not so satisfying and fun, and it gets me pissed once in a while.” He enjoys sharing his exploits on the farm through social media. He names his farm animals after film-industry colleagues.

Sam Neill net worth

How much is Sam Neill worth? Sam Neill net worth is estimated at around $15 million. His main source of income is from his acting career. Neill successful career has earned him some luxurious lifestyles and some fancy cars. He is one of the richest and influential actors in New Zealand. However, Neill has homes in Wellington, New Zealand, and Sydney. He is a supporter of the Australian Speak Easy Association and the British Stammering Association (BSA). He supports the New Zealand Labour Party and the Australian Labor Party.